3 WAYS TO STAND OUT FROM YOUR COMPETITION

Consider these facts: On any given day, almost 500,000 job applicants apply to the Monster job board in hopes that they will be contacted for an interview.  Additionally, an average of 250 resumes are received for each corporate job opening. Finding a job posting that seems a perfect match for you isn’t the answer either because the first resume is received within 200 seconds after a position is posted. (Source:  http://www.ere.net)

Now that you understand what you are up against, how do you differentiate yourself from your competition?

Demonstrate your credibility.

Showcase your strengths, reputation and value.

#1 – STORIES

 Enhance your job search strategy with Stories.  But not just any stories; your storyline must be about WHAT you did for WHOM to produce WHAT RESULT.  Throw in the obstacles and challenges you faced and you just made it a story people will remember.  Why is the obstacle important?

It invokes emotion in your reader

It creates suspense  –  the listener will want to know the end of the story

 #2 – QUOTES

It may sound overly formal or old school; however, when you receive a compliment that speaks to your differention, your BRAND, ask “May I quote you on that?”  Of course, s/he will say yes and humbled that you would want to use their statement of endorsement.  Continue reading

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Ace the Second Job Interview to Get Hired

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You got called for a job interview and you think it went well.  Now you’re being called back for a second interview. It’s a promising next step, but you’re not hired yet. You’ll have to perform well in this second round and it all depends on how you prepare.

The second interview is different from the first interview

In the first interview you probably met via telephone, SKYPE or in person with a recruiter for about 30 minutes. In this second interview, you’ll most likely meet with the hiring manager or several senior managers and you might even meet with some of your potential colleagues.  Ask your human resources contact for the roles of the people with whom you will be meeting and ask for their names so you can research them on LinkedIn.

Interviewers are impressed when job candidates have researched both the company and the background of those interviewing them.

Ask them how they define the company culture, how they came to work for the organization and what it takes to be a success

Interview #1: a screening; Interview #2: the “real deal”

Prepare for your second interview by expecting a series of questions to identify your technical skills, how you’d add value and relate your experience to the new position, as well as behavioral or emotional intelligence type questions.

Employers know that attitude is as important as aptitude.

To prepare, know the exact job requirements and expectations from carefully reading the job posting. Visit the company’s web site and read company press releases, related news stories and other general industry news to find out about their business objectives, milestones, successes and their competition.

Success Stories Sell your Value

Nothing in the interview is as important as coming prepared with stories of your success and past Continue reading

The recruiter told me I am OVERQUALIFIED – Truth or something Else?

You found a job posting that really intrigued you, customized your resume and cover letter to match up the keywords and hit the submit button.  The telephone screen went well and the two interviews too – or so you thought until you were told by the hiring manager that you were OVERQUALIFIED.

Have you ever been blindsided with those words after spending hours and hours applying and interviewing for what you thought could be your perfect match?

Are you “Over Qualified” or is there another reason you weren’t hired?

Newsflash:  you may never know the real reason you weren’t hired.  Very often, recruiters and employers tell candidates that they found another candidate who was a better fit.  Or you might be told that you were not hired because you are overqualified.

What to do?  If you are still in the interview and have an opportunity to respond, here are my suggestions:

  1. Hit the pause button before responding
  2. Muster up all your strength to avoid a defensive response
  3. Seek out clarification

This scenario is a perfect occasion to showcase your emotional intelligence.

Self awareness – identify your emotions and thoughts

Managing your emotions – avoid being defensive!

Reading the other person – his/her communication style, body language and other clues to demonstrate the degree of receptiveness to your questions

Influencing the other person – through authenticity, calmness and honesty, seek to clarify the reason for their conclusion and decision

 

This won’t work in every situation, but since you have already been denied the job, you have nothing to lose and everything to gain if you can change the perception and influence the decision.  Here are some responses:

 

“Thanks for being honest with me.  Obviously I am disappointed.  May I ask you to share with me what led you to that conclusion?”

“Oh; I am sorry that my experience could work against me.  What concerns about my background do you have?”

”I certainly appreciate your goal to hire the right person and I thank you for sharing your concerns with me.  What would make you feel better about hiring me into this position?”

The key is to exhibit composure, continued interest in the job and respect for the other individual.  Rather than being defensive and risking the discussion being negative or shut down, your best opportunity for a change to the perception is to remain positive and professional.  Even if this position doesn’t work out, you will create a favorable impression in the event that a position more suitable to your credentials is posted.

The job search is tough.  You need someone on your side – someone who knows the process and who has hired hundreds of professionals.  I hired top talent for Fortune 100 and 200 companies for 25+ years and now help job seekers navigate the murky and choppy waters of the complex job search.  I’d love to help you land your ideal job, get promoted or change careers.  Patricia@CareerWisdomCoach.com

 

Reset & Restart your Career this Summer

Summer and holidays are a time when most people sit back, relax and do their best not to think about work but, for many, it’s a time to contemplate a new career altogether.

These breaks in your regular routine provide an opportunity to take stock and reflect on your working life and consider taking a big leap to do something different.

As part of that decision, you will need to have a strategy.

For beginners, Avoid these 5 common pitfalls.

 

  1. Don’t jump into a new career before some serious reflection

You might be miserable or unfulfilled but make sure you don’t just make the change to escape your current situation.  Take the time to complete some self and career assessments as well as researching a “day in the life of” that profession you have interest in pursuing.  A good resource is www.Onetonline.org, especially when combined with connecting with someone already in the job so you can ask candid questions.

 

  1. Don’t chase what is popular; make sure you see yourself in it for awhile

Research the forecasted workforce needs of your newly discovered interest to make sure you don’t make the change to only discover the job soon becomes obsolete due to technology or lack of Continue reading

Is Your Resume “Broken”?

Most clients contact me because they are totally frustrated with writing and rewriting their resume with no results.  Daniel, who called yesterday, told me he has submitted his resume to over 75 job postings in the last few months and has not heard a word from any recruiter or company.  He told me he now realizes that he is doing “something wrong” and asked me to help him land his next position.

Want a great resume that “takes you to your next position”? 

In 5 Easy Steps, You can Transform your Resume!

  1. Your SPECIFIC LOCATION is not necessary

Not only are job seekers concerned about potential identity theft and safety issues, but your street address is not needed on your resume. Simply list your city, state, and zip code so that the recruiter and hiring manager knows that you are local and within a reasonable commute.

  1. A HEADLINE tells the world what you are or aspire to be

The mistake most people make is either not having a headline or using their current job title.  Why limit yourself, especially if you are considering a career change?  Help the recruiter by writing a short headline of key words describing yourself or using the job title of the position you are seeking.  You get “extra credit” for the headline, too, if it contains keywords which are discoverable by the ATS (Applicant Tracking System) when the recruiter is searching for candidates with specific experience, knowledge and abilities. Continue reading

Career Transition to HR – Yes you can!

Before becoming a Career Coach, I was an HR “purist” and my entire corporate career (25+ years) was spent recruiting, interviewing, selecting, managing, developing and counseling employees.  Additionally, as an HR manager, I hired almost 40 people to work with me and many of them came from other occupations with no experience in HR.  

All of these professionals had two things in common: 

  1. A strong desire to work in the field of Human Resources
  2. Absolutely NO experience in Human Resources

But they all had common experiences and strengths:

  • Communications – verbal and written
  • Problem Solving
  • Analytical expertise
  • Conflict Management Skills
  • Influential Ability
  • Ability to “Work in the Gray” and See the Big Picture

Continue reading

Get Hired by “Showing”, not “Telling”

show-dont-tell
Shawn was a stubborn client.  Though successfully employed as a Sales Manager of a highly recognized Fortune 500 biomedical company, he was eager to be promoted to a Regional Sales Manager and expand his territory as well as his influence and compensation.  When we first talked about how I worked with career coach clients, I explained that I could help him stand out in the job search against his competition – potentially hundreds of other candidates who had similar backgrounds as he.  Shawn was quick to tell me about his many successes in gaining and retaining new businesses and how well liked and respected he was by customers, colleagues and his manager. But he struggled with the HOW and WHY of his career success on his resume.      tip-the-hiring-scale-with-an-achievement-based-resume-and-profile

A few job seekers can explain how they overcame obstacles, in the work setting, to contribute greatly to the company for which they work.  But most can’t really put their finger on why they think they are qualified for a promotion, internally or externally.

“SHOW employers your value – don’t just TELL them”

Continue reading

Why your LinkedIn Profile is Costing you Thousands

Most professional job seekers are savvy enough to know that over 90% of recruiters use LinkedIn to source for top talent.  And most hiring managers complete their due diligence by Googling job candidates to research additional information.  So no problem, right, because you have a profile and it mirrors your resume.  Well, not so fast.  Just HAVING a LinkedIn profile isn’t enough; it has to be optimized, have the keywords that the recruiter is searching for, showcase your achievements prominently and much more.

Unfortunately, most LinkedIn profiles do not pass the test and, as a result, actually turn off a recruiter or hiring manager and COST otherwise qualified candidates a job interview and job offer.

That is exactly why I quit my Fortune 200 company corporate HR and Talent Management position and started a career coaching practice; I talked to too many professionals who did not communicate their value in an effective, much less a compelling way, on their resumes, networking pitches, or in the interview.  They may well have been more qualified than the final candidate, who ultimately was hired, but they just did not market them effectively and strategically.  Continue reading

How to Write a Winning Resume in 2017

designing-a-winning-resume-for-2017

 

Most job seekers know that the resume format and job search process have changed dramatically over the last few years.  To land your ideal career in 2017, you need to know and apply the following in order to attract recruiters and influence hiring managers to determine that you are the most qualified candidate.

This isn’t your Parents’ Resume………………vintage-man-2

Savvy job hunters know that an Objective statement is so last century.  It not only is dated but may harm your search because the focus of objectives are on you and employers want to hear what you can do for them.  Summary statements, similar to the elevator pitch, is a tweet-like reader’s digest version of your resume to describe your expertise and showcase your strongest accomplishments.  It is like the book jacket description to entice the reader to continue to read the remainder of your resume. If Continue reading

3 Job Search Hopes, Myths & Truths

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The Most Qualified Candidate is Hired

That is what you would expect, right?  Shouldn’t the candidate with the most relevant education and experience be hired?  In a perfect world – yes; however, many candidates do not convey their value in the job search process.  That’s exactly what I help people to do in my career coaching practice.

  • Do you know and communicate your strengths?
  • Does your resume and linked in profile convey your most significant achievements?
  • Are you able to provide examples to hiring managers of how you can transfer your past experience and knowledge to their organization?
  • How well do you respond to the behavioral interview questions?
  • Are you ready for the emotional intelligence-based interview questions?

job-search-myth

Even If Not Hired, You Will Be Told Why Not

If you have been in the job market during the past few years, you have not been contacted unless chosen for the interview and or position.  If you are not considered qualified, it is likely you will hear nothing from the organization.  Even if you go through the multi-stepped interview process, possibly take time off from a current job, incurred the cost of childcare in order to interview, and complete background questionnaires, you may not hear anything unless chosen for the job.  And it is even more likely that you will not hear anything from the recruiter or hiring manager about why you were not selected.  Continue reading