Top 3 Skills, Abilities & Traits to Get You Hired

3-skills-etc-to-get-you-hired2

People often ask me “What do employers look for? What does it take to get hired?”   As you know, there have been hundreds of books and thousands of articles written on this topic but I offer you this information based on my 25 years’ experience as a corporate talent management leader for Fortune companies, and for the past 5 years as an executive career coach. I have had vast experience in hiring talent at all levels, including leadership and the C-suite.

What Employers Seek in Top Talent Selection

Most positions, and especially, ones in leadership, require professionals who possess a high acumen in the following 3 areas and, though they may sound like common sense, are not easy to master.  In fact, it has been my experience that it is very difficult to find a management or executive candidate who possesses all three of them:

Continue reading

5 Interview Questions you must Master

Whether you haven’t interviewed for a job in a decade or if you interviewed just last week, you may not know the “whys” of interview questions and the selection process most organizations use to hire the best talent.

In a previous post, I shared a little known fact  (I don’t believe in keeping secrets) based on my 25 years in Talent Management for top Fortune 200 companies.  There are truly only three questions to a typical interview though they may take the form of many and be asked in different ways.the 5 questions you must master to ace the interview

Now I turn your attention to 5 common questions that are asked and are critical to you being seen as a viable contender for the position to which you applied. At this point, your resume has been screened by computer  “eyes” as well as a human recruiter.  You may have been through a telephone interview, simulation test, behavioral assessment and panel interview.  Now you sit across from the person who you hope will be your next manager and you have this one (and only) opportunity to answer these Continue reading

Show them you’re ready for a management role

Are you ready to take your career to the next level –  manager, director or even the C-suite?   If so, you must prove that you are the most compelling candidate and stand out as the clear choice.  How?  leadership materials

  • Speak to your past accomplishments
  • Translate your achievements to fit the needs of the organization 
  • Be prepared with your vision and strategy 

The leadership interview experience is far different from what you have had in the past.

 

And you thought your prior job interviews were grueling…………

 

Executive interview 2What’s critical for your success?

  • Deep knowledge of the industry
  • Business acumen
  • Analytical skills
  • Emotional Intelligence

Beyond these, though, a leader candidate is expected to demonstrate the following:

  • Executive Branding
    • What are your strengths?
    • What are your values?
    • What do you do better than anyone else?
    • What differentiates you?
  • The interview process is longer and more complex
    • Day long interview agendas are typical and include interviewing with individuals, panels and over lunch and/or dinner
  • Your leadership may be “tested” with problem solving exercises, simulations and case studies – especially if chosen as a finalist
  • Be proactive and share your 30-60-90 day plan even if not asked
    • Present what you would do the first 30 days, 60 days and 90 days
    • This requires a deep understanding of the prospective organization, its challenges and its competition
    • Your plan reveals your priorities and your forecast of success milestones
  • Research, research, research is essential to be able to answer the interview questions
  • The questions you ask will reveal your preparation for the interview as well as your knowledge, creativity and grasp of the position’s role in the organization

management office

Other expectations as you progress up the career ladder:

  • Impressive on-line foot print
    • What does your Google search look like?
    • Do you have leadership presence on LinkedIn?
    • Linked in connections – who do you know and who knows you?
  • Thought leadership
    • Have you shared knowledge and best practices with colleagues in your field or industry?
      • Linkedin group discussions
      • Linkedin updates
    • Are you discoverable in other online searches?
      • Publications
      • Presentations
      • Organizations and affiliations
    • Awards and honors recognizing your contributions
  • Emotional Intelligence is often the deciding factor when you face stiff competition and most of the candidates have similar work experience to yours. Employers interview and hire for individuals who are: 
    • Agile and adaptive to change
    • Stress tolerant
    • Resilient

Job seekers competing for leadership positions must know and be prepared for a long and arduous process, convey an executive presence and succeed at proving that they are worthy of being selected.

 

Interested in reading more about job search and career success, career branding, resumes and linked in profiles that  get you noticed, and acing interviews?  Check out more than 60 articles on http://www.CareerWisdomCoach.com or contact Patricia@CareerWisdomCoach.com

 

 

Stumped When Asked “What are your Strengths & Weaknesses”?

Identify your Strengths through Obstacles & Failures

There is a lot of talk about knowing your strengths, leveraging your strengths and sharing your strengths toward career success.  If you have been interviewing for a new job recently, you were probably asked to explain your strengths and weaknesses, usually one of the hardest questions for job seekers to answer.

Several best sellers have been published which promise a method for you to identify your

ID your Strengths gained by past challenges

ID your Strengths gained by past challenges

strengths by answering a quiz or series of questions about yourself.  These are all quite good but you might still come up empty when asked the question during an interview and you cannot come across with a text book answer; you have to be authentic.  You have to be you!  When coaching job seekers, I ask them a question that results in a quizzical look on their faces.

“Let’s talk about the last huge obstacle or challenge you faced at work.”  But, they usually respond, “I thought you wanted to know my strength.”  Continue reading

Showcasing Emotional Intelligence on your Resume

Show ’em your Career Smarts……emotional intelligence that is

Show 'em your Emotional Intelligence

Show ’em your Emotional Intelligence

Unless you are alone and counting beans in a cave, the ability to understand yourself and others, communicate and influence others are all critical skills and abilities of career success. With increased emphasis on collaboration and diversity, EI is becoming even more important  and companies are hiring with those attributes in mind.

What is EI?

EI is generally defined as a person’s ability to understand and manage his/her own thoughts and emotions as well having insight into others and responding in such a way to influence outcomes.  Generally speaking, the higher levels of EI you have, the more easily you can sell your ideas to others, resolve conflict, inspire and lead teams in complex and ever changing work environments.

How can I present my EI in my resume?

Start with the job posting or job description.  If it requires interpersonal communication skills, ability to work with a team or manage other people, you have a competitive edge if you can Continue reading

Job Seeker – You cost the same as a BMW

You or the BMW?

You or the BMW?

The Employer’s Dilemma:  The Ultimate Driving Machine or You?

One of the better career websites,TheLadders.com, recently asked me to offer some  job search advice to young professionals and I am delighted to do so; however, I hope the information is relevant to all job seekers, regardless of their level or industry.  I have interviewed many job candidates, during my career, and I offer you these suggestions based on that experience. While the selection process seems like a huge mystery, it is quite simple.  You, as a job seeker, need to understand the “why’s” behind the interview process and I am also offering you some “how’s” which will give you a competitive advantage.  So back to that BMW………………….

Consider the average cost of selecting a new employee:

BMW3

  • entry level professional = slightly used BMW 128
  • mid level manager = new BMW 320i
  • senior executive = brand new BMW 500 – 700 series

You may be surprised at the high cost of hiring and selection.  Studies show that the cost of interviewing, selection and training replacement employees costs between 30% and 80% of the employee’s annual salary.

In my last post, Why only three interview questions count, I explained why the hiring manager’s interview questions are simply designed to answer the following:

  1. Can you do the job?
  2. Will you do the job?
  3. Will we like to work with you?

The first two, designed to identify if job seekers have the education and experience, as well as  Continue reading

Why Only Three Interview Questions “count”

What the recruiter really wants to know

1. Can you do the job?      

2. Will you do the job?

3. Will we enjoy working with you?

Tell me about Yourself

Tell me about Yourself

 

Believe it or not, those are the three main questions the recruiters need to ask and they are the focus of every interview.

Every interview question you’ve been asked was designed as a deeper dive into those three key questions. With varying words and scenarios and situations, every question is simply a follow up to better understand you in three areas:

  • Your skills and abilities
  • What motivates you
  • If you are a good fit for the organization.
  1. Can You Do the Job? – Skills, Abilities, Experience & Strengths

It’s not just about your skills, but also about leadership and interpersonal strengths. Technical skills get you in the door but those other attributes help you climb the ladder. As you get there, managing up, down, and across become more important.

Recruiters can’t tell by looking at a piece of paper what some of the strengths and weaknesses really are. They ask for specific examples of not only what’s been successful but what you’ve done that hasn’t gone well or a task you have, quite frankly, failed at and Continue reading

When the recruiter asks “Tell me about yourself”

Learn from my mistake……..

I recall, early in my career, when I responded to that interview question with a not so brief biography, starting with where I was born, where I went to school, my family members and do I need to go on?

Tell me about Yourself

Tell me about Yourself

The recruiter stifled a few yawns but didn’t interrupt me.  I was well into my 10 minute life story when I suddenly saw the look on his face and knew I was doomed; it was no surprise that I was not hired.  I couldn’t even chalk this faux pas to a case of the nerves; I was just not aware how to interview.  Interesting that I later found a career in human resources management and was responsible for selecting candidates.

No one teaches you how to interview. 

Guidance counselors and career services offer overviews and there is information on the internet but you probably haven’t had someone guide you Continue reading

Fifty Years Old and Searching for your Ideal Job?

TOO OLD to GET HIRED?

It almost breaks my heart when  clients tell me they are convinced that they won’t  get hired due to their age.  I assure them that we baby boomers are amongst the largest workforce groups  and corporate America continues to need us.  If you are, however, like many  and have sent out scores of resumes, applied to hundreds of job board postings and just aren’t getting anywhere, let’s talk.

older job seeker tips

Whether you want to or have to work as long as you can, it’s critical for those 50 and over to stay professionally relevant.  That translates to being essential and vital despite a demanding job market.

50+ years old Job Searching:  A Double Edged Sword

Most employees over 50 are known and valued for their experience, work ethic and stability; however, they are sometimes perceived as inflexible and resistant to change – especially changes requiring them to learn new technology.  In this 2012 AARP survey, over 75% disagreed with a statement reading  “I have a difficult time keeping up with all the technology required in my work.” Continue reading

Can Emotional Intelligence get you hired? The Harvard Business Review thinks so.

Can Emotional Intelligence Boost my Job Search?My Career?

Though the Harvard Business Review has published many articles, over the past decade, on the role Emotional Intelligence pays in successful careers, I was delighted to see this publication on the magazine rack recently.  It is a special printing of a collection of articles from all the leading experts who claim Emotional Intelligence is critical to career success.

What may be surprising, and even disappointing, to job-seekers is that there are skills and characteristics that are even more important to potential employers than those directly job-

Harvard Business Review endorses Emotional Intelligence with a special edition publication June 2014

Harvard Business Review endorses Emotional Intelligence with a special edition publication June 2014

related. Your education and work experience, skills and abilities are crucial; however, other skills that speak to the candidate’s “emotional intelligence” could carry more weight than those acquired through specialized training or hands on experience.

  • Great sales people are those who develop a trusting relationship with customers
  • Brilliant IT pros can relate to the end user’s needs and provide solutions by listening and problem solving
  • Outstanding customer service employees know how to turn angry customers into loyal “fans”
  • Gifted miracle-workers (healthcare professionals) offer empathy and hope in an ever changing, fast paced and stressful high tech work environment
  • The best managers are those who care about, develop and unite their teams

Time after time, career success is found to be strongly influenced by personal qualities such as:

  • Self awareness
  • Impulse control
  • Perseverance
  • Influencing others

Emotional intelligence is an awareness of your actions and feelings and how they affect those around you. It also means that you value others, listen to their wants and needs, and are able to empathize or identify with them on many different levels, including influence, handling conflict and building teamwork.

EI & Your Job Search

As part of your job search strategy, you can demonstrate emotional intelligence in your resume, social media strategy and job interviews.

Self-Awareness– People with high emotional intelligence are usually very self-aware. They understand their emotions, and because of this, they don’t let their feelings rule them. They’re confident because they trust their intuition and don’t let their emotions get out of control. They know their strengths and weaknesses, and they work on these areas so they can perform better. Many people believe that this self-awareness is the most important part of emotional intelligence.

 

Self- Control – This is the ability to control emotions and impulses, not allowing themselves to become too angry or make rash statements. They think before they act. Characteristics of self-control are thoughtfulness, integrity and resilience.

 

Motivation– People who are self motivated are able to defer immediate results for long-term success. They set goals to keep themselves on track, are highly productive, and challenge themselves.

 

Empathy – Empathetic people are insightful to others’ wants, needs, and viewpoints. As a result, empathetic people are usually excellent at managing relationships, listening, and relating to others.

 

Relationships with Others– It’s usually easy to talk to and like people with good social skills, another sign of high emotional intelligence. They are excellent communicators, resolve conflicts and are masters at building and maintaining lasting relationships.

 

How Can You Improve Your Emotional Intelligence?

As a certified facilitator and trainer in Emotional Intelligence, I can offer you a personalized assessment to determine your level of EI.  The most effective way to improve EI is to follow the following  “3 step” plan:

  1. Assessment
  2. Action Plan
  3. Accountability Partner

I’ve written other posts on this topic.  Search under the categories to the right.

For more information on Emotional Intelligence boosting your job search strategy, contact me at Patricia @ CareerWisdomCoach.com or call 813/843-6934.