3 Job Search Hopes, Myths & Truths

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The Most Qualified Candidate is Hired

That is what you would expect, right?  Shouldn’t the candidate with the most relevant education and experience be hired?  In a perfect world – yes; however, many candidates do not convey their value in the job search process.  That’s exactly what I help people to do in my career coaching practice.

  • Do you know and communicate your strengths?
  • Does your resume and linked in profile convey your most significant achievements?
  • Are you able to provide examples to hiring managers of how you can transfer your past experience and knowledge to their organization?
  • How well do you respond to the behavioral interview questions?
  • Are you ready for the emotional intelligence-based interview questions?

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Even If Not Hired, You Will Be Told Why Not

If you have been in the job market during the past few years, you have not been contacted unless chosen for the interview and or position.  If you are not considered qualified, it is likely you will hear nothing from the organization.  Even if you go through the multi-stepped interview process, possibly take time off from a current job, incurred the cost of childcare in order to interview, and complete background questionnaires, you may not hear anything unless chosen for the job.  And it is even more likely that you will not hear anything from the recruiter or hiring manager about why you were not selected.  Continue reading

Top 3 Skills, Abilities & Traits to Get You Hired

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People often ask me “What do employers look for? What does it take to get hired?”   As you know, there have been hundreds of books and thousands of articles written on this topic but I offer you this information based on my 25 years’ experience as a corporate talent management leader for Fortune companies, and for the past 5 years as an executive career coach. I have had vast experience in hiring talent at all levels, including leadership and the C-suite.

What Employers Seek in Top Talent Selection

Most positions, and especially, ones in leadership, require professionals who possess a high acumen in the following 3 areas and, though they may sound like common sense, are not easy to master.  In fact, it has been my experience that it is very difficult to find a management or executive candidate who possesses all three of them:

Continue reading

5 Interview Questions you must Master

Whether you haven’t interviewed for a job in a decade or if you interviewed just last week, you may not know the “whys” of interview questions and the selection process most organizations use to hire the best talent.

In a previous post, I shared a little known fact  (I don’t believe in keeping secrets) based on my 25 years in Talent Management for top Fortune 200 companies.  There are truly only three questions to a typical interview though they may take the form of many and be asked in different ways.the 5 questions you must master to ace the interview

Now I turn your attention to 5 common questions that are asked and are critical to you being seen as a viable contender for the position to which you applied. At this point, your resume has been screened by computer  “eyes” as well as a human recruiter.  You may have been through a telephone interview, simulation test, behavioral assessment and panel interview.  Now you sit across from the person who you hope will be your next manager and you have this one (and only) opportunity to answer these Continue reading

Show them you’re ready for a management role

Are you ready to take your career to the next level –  manager, director or even the C-suite?   If so, you must prove that you are the most compelling candidate and stand out as the clear choice.  How?  leadership materials

  • Speak to your past accomplishments
  • Translate your achievements to fit the needs of the organization 
  • Be prepared with your vision and strategy 

The leadership interview experience is far different from what you have had in the past.

 

And you thought your prior job interviews were grueling…………

 

Executive interview 2What’s critical for your success?

  • Deep knowledge of the industry
  • Business acumen
  • Analytical skills
  • Emotional Intelligence

Beyond these, though, a leader candidate is expected to demonstrate the following:

  • Executive Branding
    • What are your strengths?
    • What are your values?
    • What do you do better than anyone else?
    • What differentiates you?
  • The interview process is longer and more complex
    • Day long interview agendas are typical and include interviewing with individuals, panels and over lunch and/or dinner
  • Your leadership may be “tested” with problem solving exercises, simulations and case studies – especially if chosen as a finalist
  • Be proactive and share your 30-60-90 day plan even if not asked
    • Present what you would do the first 30 days, 60 days and 90 days
    • This requires a deep understanding of the prospective organization, its challenges and its competition
    • Your plan reveals your priorities and your forecast of success milestones
  • Research, research, research is essential to be able to answer the interview questions
  • The questions you ask will reveal your preparation for the interview as well as your knowledge, creativity and grasp of the position’s role in the organization

management office

Other expectations as you progress up the career ladder:

  • Impressive on-line foot print
    • What does your Google search look like?
    • Do you have leadership presence on LinkedIn?
    • Linked in connections – who do you know and who knows you?
  • Thought leadership
    • Have you shared knowledge and best practices with colleagues in your field or industry?
      • Linkedin group discussions
      • Linkedin updates
    • Are you discoverable in other online searches?
      • Publications
      • Presentations
      • Organizations and affiliations
    • Awards and honors recognizing your contributions
  • Emotional Intelligence is often the deciding factor when you face stiff competition and most of the candidates have similar work experience to yours. Employers interview and hire for individuals who are: 
    • Agile and adaptive to change
    • Stress tolerant
    • Resilient

Job seekers competing for leadership positions must know and be prepared for a long and arduous process, convey an executive presence and succeed at proving that they are worthy of being selected.

 

Interested in reading more about job search and career success, career branding, resumes and linked in profiles that  get you noticed, and acing interviews?  Check out more than 60 articles on http://www.CareerWisdomCoach.com or contact Patricia@CareerWisdomCoach.com

 

 

Hired or Not? Emotional Intelligence can make the difference

Emotional Intelligence often is the “final” factor

If you are like most job seekers, when you read “strong people skills” and “strong technical skills” in a job posting, you may tend to gloss over the first to focus on selling your technical talent and experience to the prospective employer.  In fact, we often refer to people skills as the “soft” skills and that sounds secondary to anything else we might possess. WRONG!

More and more companies hire for attitude because they have been burned when hiring purely for technical skills and knowledge.  What seemed like a dream candidate turned out, occasionally, to be a problem employee who was not successful.

Hired or Not?

Hired or Not?

Organizations often use behavioral interview questions which are founded on Emotional Intelligence, referred to as the “Other Kind of Smart” like Harvey Deutschendorf and Daniel Goleman. The latter wrote a book, Emotional Intelligence:  Why It Can Matter More than IQ which soared to the top of the New York Times bestseller list for a year.  Additionally, some companies use Continue reading

Stumped When Asked “What are your Strengths & Weaknesses”?

Identify your Strengths through Obstacles & Failures

There is a lot of talk about knowing your strengths, leveraging your strengths and sharing your strengths toward career success.  If you have been interviewing for a new job recently, you were probably asked to explain your strengths and weaknesses, usually one of the hardest questions for job seekers to answer.

Several best sellers have been published which promise a method for you to identify your

ID your Strengths gained by past challenges

ID your Strengths gained by past challenges

strengths by answering a quiz or series of questions about yourself.  These are all quite good but you might still come up empty when asked the question during an interview and you cannot come across with a text book answer; you have to be authentic.  You have to be you!  When coaching job seekers, I ask them a question that results in a quizzical look on their faces.

“Let’s talk about the last huge obstacle or challenge you faced at work.”  But, they usually respond, “I thought you wanted to know my strength.”  Continue reading

Job Seeker – You cost the same as a BMW

You or the BMW?

You or the BMW?

The Employer’s Dilemma:  The Ultimate Driving Machine or You?

One of the better career websites,TheLadders.com, recently asked me to offer some  job search advice to young professionals and I am delighted to do so; however, I hope the information is relevant to all job seekers, regardless of their level or industry.  I have interviewed many job candidates, during my career, and I offer you these suggestions based on that experience. While the selection process seems like a huge mystery, it is quite simple.  You, as a job seeker, need to understand the “why’s” behind the interview process and I am also offering you some “how’s” which will give you a competitive advantage.  So back to that BMW………………….

Consider the average cost of selecting a new employee:

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  • entry level professional = slightly used BMW 128
  • mid level manager = new BMW 320i
  • senior executive = brand new BMW 500 – 700 series

You may be surprised at the high cost of hiring and selection.  Studies show that the cost of interviewing, selection and training replacement employees costs between 30% and 80% of the employee’s annual salary.

In my last post, Why only three interview questions count, I explained why the hiring manager’s interview questions are simply designed to answer the following:

  1. Can you do the job?
  2. Will you do the job?
  3. Will we like to work with you?

The first two, designed to identify if job seekers have the education and experience, as well as  Continue reading