Take the Mystery out of the Hidden Job Market

hidden-job-market-

Solve the Puzzle of the Hidden Job Market

I remember reading the Nancy Drew books, as a young girl, and was fascinated when I learned the “Secret of the Hidden Door” and other mysteries. If you are a job seeker, one of the biggest mysteries of our time is the Hidden Job Market.

It is estimated that 80% of job openings are not posted.  This is called the hidden job market.  As frustrating as it is, there are legitimate reasons why so many positions are not advertised on job boards or publicly . Your job is to understand why and know where you can find them.

Let’s Start with Why

There are many reasons why an organization may not advertise a position.  Here are some:

  • The position is not yet budgeted or approved
  • Due to pending mergers, reorganizations or acquisitions, an official announcement of an opening would be premature
  • The employer is replacing someone currently in the position and whose departure has not been finalized
  • A variety of reasons may require a confidential search       man-at-desk-overwhelmed-with-a-stack-paper-300x300

The most common reason, though, is  SHEER VOLUME.  Posting a position on a major job board  Continue reading

Invasion of the “Networking Thoughts Snatchers”

Though I look forward to and enjoy networking events, it was not always the case.  I remember feeling like a fish out of water or a stranger in a foreign land when attending a job fair or professional networking event and not knowing how to act, what to say and even how to stand.

Networking may not appear to be a natural thing; it can seem contrived and less than authentic.  But that doesn’t have to be true.  Let’s  take a step back and think about WHY we are attending the event, whether it be a career fair or your first meeting at a professional organization.

PREPARE:           networking and can't remember names

  1. Know your audience
  2. Know your purpose
  3. Anticipate conversations or questions

Don’t Worry; Everyone Has These Strange Thoughts

Don’t let the Thought Gremlins invade and distract. And they can get to anyone. A client of mine, with an outstanding sense of humor, shared some of the thoughts she had during her recent  job search. Continue reading

Showcasing Emotional Intelligence on your Resume

Show ’em your Career Smarts……emotional intelligence that is

Show 'em your Emotional Intelligence

Show ’em your Emotional Intelligence

Unless you are alone and counting beans in a cave, the ability to understand yourself and others, communicate and influence others are all critical skills and abilities of career success. With increased emphasis on collaboration and diversity, EI is becoming even more important  and companies are hiring with those attributes in mind.

What is EI?

EI is generally defined as a person’s ability to understand and manage his/her own thoughts and emotions as well having insight into others and responding in such a way to influence outcomes.  Generally speaking, the higher levels of EI you have, the more easily you can sell your ideas to others, resolve conflict, inspire and lead teams in complex and ever changing work environments.

How can I present my EI in my resume?

Start with the job posting or job description.  If it requires interpersonal communication skills, ability to work with a team or manage other people, you have a competitive edge if you can Continue reading

SELF EMPLOYED? Why you still need a resume

Entrepreneurs need similar marketing tools as job seekers.

 

I recently received a request from a successful business owner  – a resume and professional bio.  Since most of my clients are professionals seeking new career opportunities,   I assumed she was

Even the Boss needs a resume

Even the Boss needs a resume

changing life directions and seeking a corporate position.  Wrong.  She shared that she was redefining her marketing strategy and had been asked, by potential investors, for her “credential documents.”

If you have your own business or considering a start up and you think “no more resumes – ever!” think again.  Thinking you will never need to go through the grueling process of writing about  your experiences and accomplishments? Continue reading

Fifty Years Old and Searching for your Ideal Job?

TOO OLD to GET HIRED?

It almost breaks my heart when  clients tell me they are convinced that they won’t  get hired due to their age.  I assure them that we baby boomers are amongst the largest workforce groups  and corporate America continues to need us.  If you are, however, like many  and have sent out scores of resumes, applied to hundreds of job board postings and just aren’t getting anywhere, let’s talk.

older job seeker tips

Whether you want to or have to work as long as you can, it’s critical for those 50 and over to stay professionally relevant.  That translates to being essential and vital despite a demanding job market.

50+ years old Job Searching:  A Double Edged Sword

Most employees over 50 are known and valued for their experience, work ethic and stability; however, they are sometimes perceived as inflexible and resistant to change – especially changes requiring them to learn new technology.  In this 2012 AARP survey, over 75% disagreed with a statement reading  “I have a difficult time keeping up with all the technology required in my work.” Continue reading

Is Your Cover Letter working for or against you?

COVER LETTERS – those innocent but dreaded  letters or emails introducing your resume (a.k.a. your career history masterpiece  which you have painstakingly written and re-written until it is a piece of art). 

STILL NEEDED?

Ask someone if cover letters are still necessary and you will get two definitive answers:  “yes!” or “no!”

Is your cover letter killing your job search?

Is your cover letter killing your job search?

 

I get that question, too, in my role as career coach/job search strategist and reply:  “Of course and I will help you develop a cover letter the recruiter will love you for because it makes their jobs easier.”  But, then again, that was the intent of the following example  found recently on the internet and guaranteed to be the perfect cover letter for anyone:

Continue reading

Can Emotional Intelligence get you hired? The Harvard Business Review thinks so.

Can Emotional Intelligence Boost my Job Search?My Career?

Though the Harvard Business Review has published many articles, over the past decade, on the role Emotional Intelligence pays in successful careers, I was delighted to see this publication on the magazine rack recently.  It is a special printing of a collection of articles from all the leading experts who claim Emotional Intelligence is critical to career success.

What may be surprising, and even disappointing, to job-seekers is that there are skills and characteristics that are even more important to potential employers than those directly job-

Harvard Business Review endorses Emotional Intelligence with a special edition publication June 2014

Harvard Business Review endorses Emotional Intelligence with a special edition publication June 2014

related. Your education and work experience, skills and abilities are crucial; however, other skills that speak to the candidate’s “emotional intelligence” could carry more weight than those acquired through specialized training or hands on experience.

  • Great sales people are those who develop a trusting relationship with customers
  • Brilliant IT pros can relate to the end user’s needs and provide solutions by listening and problem solving
  • Outstanding customer service employees know how to turn angry customers into loyal “fans”
  • Gifted miracle-workers (healthcare professionals) offer empathy and hope in an ever changing, fast paced and stressful high tech work environment
  • The best managers are those who care about, develop and unite their teams

Time after time, career success is found to be strongly influenced by personal qualities such as:

  • Self awareness
  • Impulse control
  • Perseverance
  • Influencing others

Emotional intelligence is an awareness of your actions and feelings and how they affect those around you. It also means that you value others, listen to their wants and needs, and are able to empathize or identify with them on many different levels, including influence, handling conflict and building teamwork.

EI & Your Job Search

As part of your job search strategy, you can demonstrate emotional intelligence in your resume, social media strategy and job interviews.

Self-Awareness– People with high emotional intelligence are usually very self-aware. They understand their emotions, and because of this, they don’t let their feelings rule them. They’re confident because they trust their intuition and don’t let their emotions get out of control. They know their strengths and weaknesses, and they work on these areas so they can perform better. Many people believe that this self-awareness is the most important part of emotional intelligence.

 

Self- Control – This is the ability to control emotions and impulses, not allowing themselves to become too angry or make rash statements. They think before they act. Characteristics of self-control are thoughtfulness, integrity and resilience.

 

Motivation– People who are self motivated are able to defer immediate results for long-term success. They set goals to keep themselves on track, are highly productive, and challenge themselves.

 

Empathy – Empathetic people are insightful to others’ wants, needs, and viewpoints. As a result, empathetic people are usually excellent at managing relationships, listening, and relating to others.

 

Relationships with Others– It’s usually easy to talk to and like people with good social skills, another sign of high emotional intelligence. They are excellent communicators, resolve conflicts and are masters at building and maintaining lasting relationships.

 

How Can You Improve Your Emotional Intelligence?

As a certified facilitator and trainer in Emotional Intelligence, I can offer you a personalized assessment to determine your level of EI.  The most effective way to improve EI is to follow the following  “3 step” plan:

  1. Assessment
  2. Action Plan
  3. Accountability Partner

I’ve written other posts on this topic.  Search under the categories to the right.

For more information on Emotional Intelligence boosting your job search strategy, contact me at Patricia @ CareerWisdomCoach.com or call 813/843-6934.

 

Robots reading resumes?

If you haven’t heard, your resume probably will be “read” by a robot before someone’s eyes have a chance to review your qualifications against the job being pursued.  That presents challenges, especially, if you are going by the old school of writing your resume.

Applicant Tracking System (aka Robot)

Applicant Tracking System (aka Robot)

ATS stands for Applicant Tracking System and most corporations “employ” this method of screening candidates for positions posted.  The truth of the matter is that you need to know the new rules of resume writing and applying for jobs in order to get to the coveted interview and have any chance at a job offer. Frustrating?

Continue reading

Linked In – Do It Right (Part 2)

In my last post,  I covered the basics of a Linked In Profile and one reader asked  for more techniques to create a winning strategy using this powerful job search/career management tool so here’s Part 2.

This post will help you to create the WOW factor you need to really showcase your talent and give you the needed competitive advantage.

... with LinkedIn

… with LinkedIn

Your ultimate goal is to interest the reader, whether that be a recruiter, hiring manager, colleague  or potential client into reading more of your profile, connecting with you, meeting with you and, ultimately, working with you.Linked In is like a “branding genie”,

Continue reading

Recruiters’ Brains When Reading Resumes

Estimates vary on the length of time recruiters and hiring managers spend reading resumes.  Some experts estimate a frightening six seconds but most estimate the average is about 30 seconds. In either case, you have very little time to make your case, prove you possess the qualifications for the position applied for and leave the recruiter “wanting more” – to be gained in the coveted interview.

heatmap of a resume #2

Other studies actually track the eye movement and brain activity of these recruiters as they peruse the resume (or Linked In profile ).

In the examples below, note that the red areas correspond to more brain activity and in the left hand example, there is red at the top third section, but it disappears thereafter – so does the interest of the recruiter as s/he moves your resume to the “No” pile. Continue reading