Your ‘Good” Resume just Cost You the Job you Wanted

Is the resume “dead”?  According to some, yes; it is. But the resume is still the foundation for your networking, LinkedIn profile, screening interviews and face to face interviews.

The purpose of your resume is to:

  • convey your value to a prospective employer
  • get an invitation for an interview
  • showcase your achievements

And, first, you need to get through the ATS robot which screens you “in” or “out” based on programmed keywords and key phrases determined critical according to the hiring manager.

I have reviewed over 40,000 resumes in my career and most have not met the “interview-worthy” test.  Why?

Your Resume is failing you

YOU ARE CONFUSING THE RECRUITER –  Recruiters just don’t have the time or desire to guess what job or profession you want. You have 6 – 18 seconds so make the most of it. I led a team of corporate recruiters and each, on the average, reviewed 200 resumes a day!  If your resume is forwarded on to the hiring manager, you may be one of 10 – 20 resumes and s/he will take about 5 minutes to review your resume. Bottom line: you must make those quick “reviews” count. Prospective employers need to quickly see what value you would bring to the team and the organization. If they like what they see, they’ll want to meet with you.

YOUR RESUME IS TOO GENERIC – the most common mistake I see is the resume written to address several job opportunities.  It is overly general and cheats the job seeker of creating a compelling message of value based on specific experience education closely matched to a particular profession or job.  While you can have a master resume, take the time to customize it to a specific job posting of interest.

YOU DON’T STAND OUT  – Most Accounting Manager resumes all look the same.  Most IT Sales Director resumes look the same.  YOU HAVE TO STAND OUT!

 Write a professional summary of 3 – 5 sentences and concisely describe your scope of responsibility, types of industries, clients, and transferable experience.  Help the reader of your resume to “see” you in their organization.  If a recruiter or hiring manager reads nothing else, your “Summary” should be all they need to know about you. Highlight your knowledge (relevant degrees and industry or functional knowledge), your experience (what you’ve done that’s most relevant), your accomplishments (what qualifies you best for this position), and your personal qualities (how people describe you).

YOU FAILED  THE “TV REPORTER” TEST –  Imagine you are interviewed by a reporter and have 30 seconds to make your point. Write out a few bullet points you want to make and write supporting information. 

  • Include your most valuable achievements
  • Include your toughest assignments
  • Back up your claims with numbers (did you increase sales, decrease costs, etc?)
  • What are you recognized for by those who work with you or your clients?

Incorporate these changes and your resume will better serve you to demonstrate your experience, accomplishments and open the door to an interview.

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Want to know more about how to STAND OUT and GET HIRED sooner?  I have written over 80 articles (to be published soon) and you can find them at www.CareerWisdomCoach.com

Better still, contact me and we can discuss how I can help you. Patricia@CareerWisdomCoach.com

How to Write a Winning Resume in 2017

designing-a-winning-resume-for-2017

 

Most job seekers know that the resume format and job search process have changed dramatically over the last few years.  To land your ideal career in 2017, you need to know and apply the following in order to attract recruiters and influence hiring managers to determine that you are the most qualified candidate.

This isn’t your Parents’ Resume………………vintage-man-2

Savvy job hunters know that an Objective statement is so last century.  It not only is dated but may harm your search because the focus of objectives are on you and employers want to hear what you can do for them.  Summary statements, similar to the elevator pitch, is a tweet-like reader’s digest version of your resume to describe your expertise and showcase your strongest accomplishments.  It is like the book jacket description to entice the reader to continue to read the remainder of your resume. If Continue reading